Tennessee Safe Baby Courts

New Video Features Safe Baby Courts

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse recently created a new video featuring the Coffee County Safe Baby Court and its importance to helping families in the area succeed. Watch the video here. 

Middle Schoolers Host Toy Drive for Coffee County Safe Baby Court

A group of Coffee County Middle School students took time this holiday season to collect toys for area’s specialty courts, including the Safe Baby Court. The students were featured in an article in the Manchester Times, available here. 

Coffee County Safe Baby Court Coordinator Starts Food Pantry

Coffee County Safe Baby Court Coordinator Sheila Barrera and her counterpart in the area’s Veterans Court, Staria Davidson, were recently featured in a Tullahoma News article on their creation of The Store House, an initiative that provides free groceries to anyone in need. The duo started the venture in August 2018 and is now serving over 50 families a week, thanks in part to the relationships it has built with local retailers and other entities. Read the full story here.

Safe Baby Courts Focus on Battling Effects of Abuses and Addictions on Children

The Manchester Times recently wrote an extensive article on the Coffee County Safe Baby Court.  Read the article here.

Coffee County Specialty Courts Featured in Article

The Coffee County Safe Baby Court, and other specialty courts in the area, were featured in an article in the Manchester Times.

“That’s the most critical time developmentally,” Safe Baby Court Coordinator Sheila Barrera said in the article. “Most of these babies are taken from their home. That can change the structure of their brain – they do not hit milestones, they do not learn like other children. That can be reversed, but it takes a lot of work.”

Read the article here. 

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Topic of Article

Sheila Barrera, coordinator of the Coffee County Safe Baby Court, was featured in an article in the Manchester Times on the rise of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome in Tennessee. NAS has risen more than 1,700 percent since 1999, due in most part to the opioid epidemic. Read the article here.